Health Blogs

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Pregnancy

Rheumatoid arthritis itself doesn’t seem to damage  the developing baby, even if RA is active during pregnancy. In fact that  70% to 80%  percent of women with RA have improvement of their symptoms during pregnancy. Although few  women with RA may have a slight risk of miscarriage or low-birth-weight babies, the huge  majority of women have normal pregnancies without complications. However many drugs for rheumatoid arthritis including methotrexate (Otrexup, Rheumatrex, Trexall) and leflunomide (Arava)  can cause birth defects.

 

These equal  medications may also cause birth defects if they are taken by father before the mother conceives. Therefore, it’s important to communication  to your doctor about altering treatment several  months before you or your spouse try to get pregnant. If you’re pregnant or planning and thinking to be, you may wonder how having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could affect your pregnancy. Here’s few  good news, Several  women with RA find that their symptoms go into remission during pregnancy. What’s more, RA doesn’t seem to affect your chances of getting or staying pregnant. When you have RA, it’s important not to get pregnant until you are ready. That means having your disease under the best possible control for at least three to six months before you try to conceive. Once they get pregnant, about half of women with RA  that in addition to the joys of impending motherhood, they have the bonus of reduced disease activity during their pregnancy. This is happens  pregnancy can trigger few term changes to your immune system.Unfortunately the other half continue to have active disease, which is why it’s critical to stay on all prescribed medication throughout your pregnancy and birth.