What Does Soda Do to Your Teeth?

Sugar in soda combines with bacteria in your mouth to form acid, which attacks the teeth. Diet or “sugar-free” soda contains its own acid, which also can damage teeth. Each attack lasts about 20 minutes and starts over with every sip of soda you take. These ongoing acid attacks weaken tooth enamel.

Effect of Soda on the Teeth:

Both diet and regular sodas can erode the protective enamel on the teeth. Soda lowers the pH level of the mouth and softens tooth enamel. Erosion starts when the acids in soft drinks encounter the tooth enamel, which is the outermost protective layer on your teeth.

Sports drinks and fruit juices can also damage enamel. When you take soda, the sugars it contains interact with bacteria in your mouth to form acid. This acid damages your teeth. Both regular and sugar-free sodas also contain their own acids, and these attack the teeth too.

Non-cola sodas, lemonade, and sports drinks can cause significant damage to your teeth enamel, which can lead to tooth decay. It’s good for your body and won’t damage your teeth like soda and other caffeinated beverages. Both diet and regular sodas can erode the protective enamel on the teeth.

Soda lowers the pH level of the mouth and softens tooth enamel.  The acidity of the sweeteners and the carbonation can lead to tooth decay.

How to prevent tooth decay due to Soda intake?

  • Use fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse.
  • Using fluoride dental products can keep your mouth healthy and reduce the risk of tooth decay.
  • One of the good ways to protect teeth from the harmful effects of soda is to avoid or minimize the amount of soda that you drink.
  • Diet sodas and other sugar-free drinks are usually highly acidic, which weakens the enamel on your teeth and makes them more susceptible to cavities and dental erosion. The level of phosphoric acid, citric acid, and/or tartaric acid is usually high in sugar-free drinks so it’s best to avoid them.